People

Faith M. Inman-Narahari

Graduate StudentUCLA Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and Center for Tropical Research

phone: (808) 333-4702
e-mail: ohia@ucla.edu

Website

Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

University of California, Los Angeles
621 Charles E. Young Dr. South
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1606

Center for Tropical Research
Institute of the Environment and Sustainability

University of California, Los Angeles
Lakretz Hall, Suite 300
619 Charles E. Young Dr. East
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1496

Current Projects

Seedling dynamics in Hawaiian rainforest

I am interested in discovering how processes that are important in other tropical and temperate forest such as density-dependence and niche adaptations operate in Hawaiian forests. Within the mapped Laupahoehoe Forest Dynamics Plot, I have established 65 census stations to measure seed rain and seedling distribution, abundance, survival and growth. Each census station consists of one 0.5-m² seed trap surrounded by three 1 x1-m seedling plots. Within each plot, all seedlings are mapped, tagged, identified to species, and measured (height and number of leaves).  Seed rain is measured by collecting, identifying, and counting seeds from seed traps every month. These data are coupled with light data taken using quantum sensors at the 1 x1-m seedling plot to measure relative PAR and canopy photos to measure light at the 20 x 20-m quadrat level.

We have found that Hawaiian tree seedling distribution is highly correlated with adult abundance and regeneration substrate (Inman-Narahari et al. 2009). Further research will include measurements of plant physiological traits that are predictive of plant growth and a common garden experiment to distinguish interspecific differences among forest tree seedling species.

My advisors are Lawren Sack and Stephen Hubbell. I am collaborating with Rebecca Ostertag at the University of Hawaii, Hilo and Christian Giardiana and Sudan Cordell at the USDA-Forest Service Pacific Islands Research Station, Institute of Pacific Islands Forestry. This research project is funded by a Center for Tropical Forest Science research grant from the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute.

Digital data collection methods

For the first census of the two 4-ha plots in the Hawaii Permanent Plot Network, I developed methods for digitally collecting tree attribute and location information using ESRI software and ruggedized field computers. These methods have been compared to traditional paper-based data collection methods in an effort to evaluate the expected increases in efficiency (Inman-Narahari et al. in review).

Undergraduate research: Tree fern mortality

This summer I will be co-advising an undergraduate research project with Pacific Internship Programs for Exploring Science (PIPES) intern Molly Winters to measure tree fern mortality caused by damage from invasive pigs.

Education

  • Ph.D. student, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. UCLA. 2009-present
  • M.S. Botany. Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC. 2005.

  • BS (Ecology) and BA (French). The Evergreen State College, Olympia, WA. 2000.

Honors, Grants, and Fellowships

2009
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute Center for Tropical Forest Studies Research Grant ($11,705).
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Department, University of California Los Angeles, Vavra Fellowship and Pauley Fellowship ($26,000 for 3 years).
University of California Los Angeles Chancellor’s Prize ($5000 for 2 years).

2008
Employee of the Year Nominee, Research Corporation of the University of Hawaii

2005
University Graduate Student Association, Block Grant to sponsor Zoology/Botany Graduate Research Symposium ($1,740).
North Carolina State University, Best Master of Science Oral Presentation & 2nd Place Poster at Zoology/Botany Graduate Research Symposium ($100 & $25).
College of Agriculture and Life Science Office of International Studies International Travel Award  ($1,000).

2004
National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, Budweiser Conservation Scholarship to conduct Master’s Research ($10,000).

2003
Research/Teaching Assistantship, Botany Department, North Carolina State University North Carolina State University.

Selected Publications and Presentations

F. Inman, C. Giardina, R. Ostertag, S. Cordell, and L. Sack. 2010. Digital data collection methods in forest dynamics plots. Methods in Ecology and Evolution. in review.

F. Inman-Narahari, K. Nelson-Kaula, R. Ostertag, S. Cordell, C. Giardina, and L. Sack. Regeneration patterns in a native dominated Hawaiian montane wet forest. Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America, Albuquerque, NM, 2009.

K. Nelson-Kaula, F. Inman-Narahari, R. Ostertag, C. Giardina, S. Cordell, L. Sack. Electronic data collection methods for tree and seedling census data in forest dynamics plots. Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America, Albuquerque, NM, 2009.

Website: Hawai’i’s permanent plot network for research, monitoring, and education. 2009. www.hippnet.hawaii.edu.
F. Inman, L. Sack, S. Cordell, R. Ostertag, and C. Giardina. HIPPNET: Hawai’i’s contribution to the Center for Tropical Forest Science plot network. CTFS Database II Workshop, Gamboa, Panama, 2008.

R. Ostertag, C. Giardina, S. Cordell, L. Sack, L. Ellsworth, and F. Inman. HIPPNET: Hawai‘i’s Permanent Plot Network for research, monitoring, and education. Seventeenth Annual Hawai’i Conservation Conference, Honolulu, HI, 2008.

F. Inman, R. Ostertag, C. Giardina, S. Cordell, and L. Sack. Hawai’i Permanent Plot Network: methods, progress, and updates. Hawai’i Ecosystems Project Meeting, Hilo, HI, 2008.

R. Ostertag, F. Inman, and L. Ellsworth. EPSCoR and the HIPPNET Project. Hawai’i Ecosystems Project Meeting, Hilo, HI, 2007.

L. Sack, S. Cordell, R. Ostertag, C. Giardina, and C. Cole. How do Hawaiian native forests function over the long-term?: the Hawai‘i Permanent Plot Network (HIPPNET) for monitoring, research and education. Sixteenth Annual Hawai’i Conservation Conference, Honolulu, HI, 2007. presenter.

F. Inman, L. Pratt, and L. Loope. Limiting factors of Portulaca sclerocarpa (A.Gray) in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Sixteenth Annual Hawai’i Conservation Conference, Honolulu, HI, 2007.

F. Inman and L. Pratt. Limiting factors for rare plants in Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park. Fifteenth Annual Hawaii Conservation Conference, Honolulu, HI, 2006.

F. Inman, T. Wentworth, M. Groom, C. Brownie, and R. Lea. 2007. Using artificial canopy gaps to restore Puerto Rican Parrot (Amazona vittata) habitat in tropical timber plantations. Forest Ecology and Management 243:169-177.

F. Inman, T. Wentworth, M. Groom, C. Brownie, and R. Lea. Using artificial canopy gaps to restore Puerto Rican Parrot (Amazona vittata) habitat in tropical timber plantations. Ecological Society of America and Society for Ecological Restoration Joint Meeting, San Jose, CA, 2007.


CTR Bird

Center for Tropical Research | UCLA Institute of the Environment and Sustainability
La Kretz Hall, Suite 300 | 619 Charles E. Young Dr. East | Los Angeles, CA 90095-1496

The Center for Tropical Research, located on the third floor of La Kretz Hall, is part of the Institute of the Environment and Sustainability at the University of California, Los Angeles. For general inquiries, contact Christa Gomez, CTR Office Manager, at 310-206-6234, or by email at cgomez@lifesci.ucla.edu. Visitors are always welcome.

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