'I am Te Urewera and Te Urewera is Me' - Place and Identity in the New Zealand Rainforest

'I am Te Urewera and Te Urewera is Me' - Place and Identity in the New Zealand Rainforest

Friday, May 2nd, 2014

La Kretz Hall, Suite 300

RSVP to kthomas@ioes.ucla.edu by April 28th

About the Lecture

In 2013 an historic settlement was made between an indigenous Maori tribe and the New Zealand government, addressing more than a century of colonial oppression and land theft. Fundamental to the settlement was a decision to restore to the Tuhoe tribe governance of their traditional homeland—an 800-square-mile tract of rainforest known as Te Urewera. Kennedy Warne, author of Tuhoe: Portrait of a Nation, will discuss Tuhoe understanding of connectivity to land, and why it matters to them that no one “owns” Te Urewera.

About the Speaker

Kennedy Warne was the founding editor of New Zealand Geographic magazine, established in 1988 with similar editorial aims as those of National Geographic. He now freelances for both the New Zealand and American magazines, and has written books on the world’s disappearing mangrove forests (Let Them Eat Shrimp) and an indigenous New Zealand Maori tribe (Tuhoe: Portrait of a Nation). He is interested in the role of narrative in shaping public sentiment in areas of environmental ethics and social justice.